losr Reform Act of 2006


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here were some important changes in the California conservatorship law enacted by the Conservatorship Reform Act of 2006 that have recently taken effect. These changes will affect Conservators here in Alameda County and Contra Costa County.

Regarding moving a Conservatee, Conservators must give notice as follows:

  1. Notice Before Moving a Conservatee. Conservators planning to move a Conservatee from her/his personal residence must first give fifteen-days notice to all relatives within the first and second degree and anyone who requested special notice, before moving the Conservatee. Of course, if there is a medical emergency, the Conservatee can be moved without prior notice.
  2. Notice After the Conservatee is Moved. After the Conservatee is moved, a second notice, which states the new residence of the Conservatee, is required to be mailed to all relatives within the first and second degree.
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here were some important changes in the California conservatorship law enacted by the Conservatorship Reform Act of 2006 that have recently taken effect. These changes will affect Conservators here in Alameda County and Contra Costa County.

Regarding what documents Conservators must request and save, the new rules are as follows:

  1. Original bills from care facilities. Conservators now must save the original monthly statement/invoice from the assisted living facility or skilled nursing facility for inclusion in the documents filed with an accounting.
  2. Original bank statements. Conservators must also retain original bank statements, and include them in the documents filed with an accounting. For most Conservators, the Court requires the filing of the original bank statements only for the beginning of the account period and the end. However, if you are a professional fiduciary, the Court requires that all original bank statements for the entire account period be either filed or lodged (depending upon the County), with the Court.